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I think the technical term for this is EGADS! Please be patient as we curse and yell at a database mixup that deep sixed dozens of our database entries. We need to clean up or recreate them one by one. Should be fun...

Sep 06, 2022

Minions: The Rise of Gru 4K review

The Despicable Me and Minions franchise has been attracting audiences and dollars since the release of Despicable Me in 2010. In this latest instalment, Minions: The Rise of Gru, we get to see everyone’s favourite villain and his pint-sized henchman in a story that takes us back to the 1970s, when Gru (Steve Carell) was just an 11-year-old with dreams of world domination. Universal has just released a 4K version and I had a chance to check it out.

Gru’s always been precocious — I mean most villains wait until their twenties — but this preteen has the possibility of joining the Vicious 6, a group of the most notorious villains in the world. When they make fun of him for his age, Gru manages to steal a precious stone from the group and finds himself the prey in a massive hunt to get it back. Gru is in need of some help and it’s up to the Minions to save their leader. Though the setting is new, many of the hijinks are very familiar, which depending on your point of view is either a nice, comforting diversion or a franchise rehashing what works. The voice cast includes the talents of Alan Arkin, Julie Andrews, Jean-Claude Van Damme, Taraji P. Henson, Russell Brand, Michelle Yeoh, Lucy Lawless and Danny Trejo.

The 2160p HEVC / H.265 encoded upscaled 4K digital transfer with Dolby Vision and HDR10 is presented in a 2.39:1 aspect ratio. It’s a crystal clear video presentation that captures the details in the computer animation very well. It’s really detailed animation, so I can actually discuss how much detail there is in elements like hair and textiles. The HDR colour grading also boosts the brightness and colour depth of the dazzling 1970s colour palette. Deep black levels and no evidence of compression issues or digital noise. It just looks great.

On the audio side of things, your ears will be dazzled by the Minions on an English Dolby Atmos soundtrack that folds back to Dolby TrueHD 7.1 as well as a Latin American Spanish Dolby Digital Plus 7.1 track and European and Canadian French Dolby Digital 5.1 tracks. Subtitles are available for English SDH, Spanish and French. The Atmos is used very well with some of the action taking place above us in the height tracks, while the surrounds immerse you in the world of Gru’s childhood. The score is bright and dynamic, while the low end gives extra heft to both the effects and the bass of the score. Dialogue is clear, centred and well prioritized.

The Minions: The Rise of Gru set comes with a 4K disc, a Blu-ray disc and a digital code. There’s roughly sixty minutes of bonus material including two mini-movies, an extended scene, outtakes from the recording sessions, a look at the movie’s key characters, a piece on the animation process, a look at 1970s food, fashion and funk, a piece on the Minion’s martial arts, a craft lesson on building your own lair, a drawing lesson, and how to dress your plush Minions in retro clothes.

The Minions: The Rise of Gru 4K has great video and audio and a fun selection of franchises. If you’re in love with these characters, this one is recommended.

Sep 04, 2022

Fatal Attraction 4K review

To celebrate the 35th anniversary of Adrian Lyne’s sexual thriller Fatal Attraction, Paramount is releasing the 1987 film on 4K. This is just two year’s after it was released on Blu-ray based on the same 4K scan used to make this year’s disc, an act that has many collectors wondering if Paramount is double-dipping more than George Costanza at a funeral reception. I had a chance to take a look.

Michael Douglas plays Dan, a lawyer with a loving wife, Beth (Anne Archer), and a daughter. A reckless fling with a book editor named Alex (Glenn Close) turns dangerous when she angrily begins to stalk him. Close is simply magnificent in the role and it’s worth a viewing just to see that performance.

The 2160p HEVC / H.265 encoded native 4K digital transfer with Dolby Vision and HDR10 is presented in a 1.85:1 aspect ratio. It’s a very sharp image with amazing details in the faces, hair and textiles and even the smoke of Alex’s cigarettes. The colour palette leans to more muted fall tones, but the HDR colour grading makes the whites pop. The black levels are a little more problematic. Though most scenes generally don’t lose any details in darker moments, in some darker scenes anyone in a dark outfit is in danger of disappearing into the background. Shot on film, the transfer does have a subtle grain structure, but occasionally it looks like Paramount has tried scrubbing the grain so you get some shots within scenes that suddenly lose a degree of detail.

On the audio side, your ears have the choice of an English Dolby TrueHD 5.1 soundtrack as well as German, Spanish, French and Italian Dolby Digital 2.0 tracks. Subtitles are available for English, English SDH, French, German, Italian, Japanese, and Spanish. This is the same 5.1 track as previous Blu-ray releases. The film may be a thriller, but the soundtrack is anything but. It’s a very front-heavy soundscape and I’m sure your surrounds will be surprised when they’re very occasionally asked to play some ambient sounds. They’ll also be jealous of your subwoofer, which apparently gets the night off. Dialogue is clear and well-prioritized in the mix.

The 4K set comes with the 4K disc, 2020’s Blu-ray, and a digital code. The extras (all on the included Blu-ray) are a bit light, consisting of audio commentary from Adrian Lyne, an interview with Lyne, some rehearsal footage and an alternate ending.

The Fatal Attraction 4K has a very good video presentation (minus the grain smoothing and black levels) and an underwhelming soundtrack as well as sparse extras. I’d pick it up for the performances and most of the video presentation, but if you do have the 2020 release already, it’s not a huge upgrade.

Sep 03, 2022

Star Trek: The Original Motion Picture 6-Movie Collection 4K review

It seems like just yesterday that Paramount released the Star Trek: The Original 4-Movie Collection on 4K. Well, actually, it was just last September and now, a year later, we get the Star Trek: The Original Motion Picture 6-Movie Collection on 4K. This set contains the following releases: Star Trek: The Motion Picture – Theatrical Cut, Star Trek The Motion Picture – Director’s Edition, Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan, Star Trek III: The Search for Spock, Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home, Star Trek V: The Final Frontier and Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country. I had a chance to take an early look.

For video and audio details of the first four films (minus Star Trek The Motion Picture – Director’s Edition) check out last year’s review of the Star Trek: The Original 4-Movie Collection. Now let’s get on to the newest addition to the set…

Star Trek The Motion Picture was rushed to meet its 1979 release date but in 2001 Paramount gave director Robert Wise a chance to work on a Director’s Edition for the Special Edition DVDs they were releasing. Wise’s new edit also updated the visual effects. With this release, the print was meticulously restored and the effects upgraded for 4K. The 2160p HEVC / H.265 encoded native 4K digital transfer with Dolby Vision and HDR10 is presented in a 2.39:1 aspect ratio. It looks great, with amazing detail in the textiles, facial features and environments. The colour palette is equally good from muted browns to popping reds and the HDR really highlights the instruments and engine glow. Black levels are deep with great detail in shadows and darker scenes. As a film transfer, there’s a light grain structure. There’s no sign of digital noise or compression artifacts.

On the audio side, you have the choice of an English Dolby Atmos track that folds back to Dolby TrueHD 7.1, as well as French, German and Spanish Dolby Digital 5.1 tracks. Subtitles are available for English, English SDH, Danish, German, Spanish (Spain), Spanish (Latin America), French, Italian, Dutch, Norwegian, Finnish, and Swedish. The soundtrack here is an upgrade, as the Director’s Edition gets an Atmos soundscape with everything from sound effects and the score getting a chance to visit your height channels. The surrounds put you in the scene, playing host to ambient sounds and action effects that move seamlessly through the soundscape. There’s plenty of low-frequency action. Dialogue is clear, centred and well-priortized in the mix.

The Director’s edition comes with the 4K, a Blu-ray copy and a digital code. Bonus features are spread between the 4K and the Blu-ray and include old and legacy features. The 4K contains an audio commentary from David C. Fein, Mike Matessino, and Daren Dochterman, a commentary by Robert Wise, Douglas Trumbull, John Dykstra, Jerry Goldsmith, and Stephen Collins, a text commentary by Michael and Denise Okuda and an isolated score track. The Blu-ray contains the new and legacy extras. There’s a new 8-part documentary called The Human Adventure that runs over 48 minutes and focuses on the new cut, three new deleted scenes, effects and costume tests, and a look at the computer display graphics. Legacy features included a look at the Star Trek Universe, storyboards, deleted scenes from the theatrical cut, deleted scenes from the 1983 TV version, a teaser trailer, a theatrical trailer and TV spots.

The second addition to last year’s release, Star Trek V: The Final Frontier, came out in 1989. It was helmed by franchise star William Shatner. Shatner wanted to veer away from the action and light comedy of some of the previous instalments and get into science fiction’s more heady themes of humanity’s place in the universe. The story sees the crew chasing a renegade Vulcan searching for God at the centre of the universe. The film went through many rewrites to please both the cast and series creator Gene Roddenberry and a WGA strike led to a shortened pre-production phase. The result was a film that didn’t quite hit with audiences and despite a record opening, quickly plunged in the box office rankings.

The 2160p HEVC / H.265 encoded native 4K digital transfer with Dolby Vision and HDR10 is presented in a 2.39:1 aspect ratio. The 4K transfer makes all the usual suspects (faces, hair, textiles and sets) look amazing, the colour palette looks great and the black levels are deep. The visual effects of this film were budget-constrained and the 4K only makes those issues stand out more.

On the audio side, there’s an English Dolby TrueHD 7.1 soundtrack as well as French, German and Spanish Dolby Digital 2.0 tracks and a Japanese Dolby Digital 5.1 track. Subtitles are available for English, English SDH, French, German, Japanese, Spanish, Danish, Dutch, Finnish, Norwegian, and Swedish. The 7.1 track is the same track from the 2009 Blu-ray release. It’s a great track that makes great use of the surrounds and your subwoofer. The score sounds great and the dialogue is clear, centred and well-prioritized.

Star Trek V: The Final Frontier also comes with a Blu-ray copy and a digital code. Legacy extras (nothing new for this release) are spread between the 4K and the Blu-ray. The 4K has an audio commentary from William Shatner and Liz Shatner and a commentary from Michael & Denise Okuda, Judith & Garfield Reeves-Stevens, and Daren Dochterman. The Blu-ray contains the aforementioned commentaries as well as various featurettes on the production, the Star Trek Universe, deleted scenes, a production gallery, a gag reel, storyboards, trailers and TV spots.

Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country was the final voyage of the original crew and after the failure of the previous film, Paramount brought in director Nicholas Meyer, who previously directed The Wrath of Khan. The film echoes the ending of the Cold War with a story line that has the Klingons and Federation seeking peace after the Klingons’ home planet’s existence is threatened after its moon is destroyed. Kirk, distrustful of the Klingons, is tasked with escorting their peace emissary. When the Klingon chancellor is assassinated, Kirk and McCoy are blamed, arrested, and sentenced to life by the Klingon warrior General Chang (Christopher Plummer). Peace, trust, loyalty and aging are among the themes explored in this send-off to the original crew of the Starship Enterprise. The 4K disc contains both the theatrical release and the director’s cut.

The 2160p HEVC / H.265 encoded native 4K digital transfer with Dolby Vision and HDR10 is presented in a 2.39:1 aspect ratio. As with the other movies in this set, the detail is fantastic from uniforms, facial textures and environments. Again, the colour palette is excellent from muted tones to popping reds and the HDR enhances the highlights. Deep black levels with excellent details in darker scenes. Shot on Super35 film, the grain structure in this transfer looks pretty good.

On the audio side, Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country comes with an English Dolby TrueHD 7.1 soundtrack as well as a German, Spanish, French and Japanese Dolby Digital 5.1 tracks. Subtitles are available for English, English SDH, French, German, Japanese, Spanish, Danish, Dutch, Finnish, Norwegian, and Swedish. As with the other films in the set, the 7.1 soundscape makes good use of the surrounds to place you in the action and your subwoofer adds “oomph” to the proceedings. Cliff Eidelman’s score is clear and dynamic and dialogue is clear, centred and well-prioritized in the mix.

The Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country 4K comes with both the theatrical release and director’s cut, while the Blu-ray has only the theatrical release. There’s also a digital code. There’s no new extras for this release but there are a lot of legacy extras. The 4K has an audio commentary from Nicholas Meyer and Denny Martin Flinn, a commentary from Larry Nemecek and Ira Steven Behr and a director’s cut text commentary from Michael and Denise Okuda. The Blu-ray has the two audio commentaries, a 26 minute featurette called “The Perils of Peacemaking”, pieces on the production and farewell to the characters, a series of featurettes for the Star Trek Universe, a tribute to DeForest Kelley, interviews with the cast, a production gallery, storyboards, a convention appearance by Meyer, a teaser trailer and a theatrical trailer.

With entertaining stories, excellent audio and video and a great selection of extras Star Trek fans will not be disappointed adding the Star Trek: The Original Motion Picture 6-Movie Collection on 4K to their collection.

Sep 02, 2022

Friday the 13th 4k review

After seeing the success of 1978’s Halloween, producer/director Sean S. Cunningham decided to make his own horror flick and in 1980 the project, Friday the 13th, was released launching a franchise. It also gave birth to one of the slasher genre’s most iconic characters, Jason Voorhees, though he only appears as a young boy in this film. Paramount has released a 4K and I had a chance to review it.

The movie centres around Camp Crystal Lake, which decades earlier had been the scene of an accidental drowning that was followed by the death of several camp counselors. Despite warnings from the locals, the camp is reopening and several young counselors (including an early film role for Kevin Bacon) arrive to set it up, have fun, and have sex. A mysterious figure has other plans for them and one by one they begin to be the victims of some grisly murders.

The 2160p HEVC / H.265 encoded native 4K digital transfer with Dolby Vision and HDR10 is presented in a 1.85:1 aspect ratio. The transfer is from a new restored remaster sourced from the original camera negatives. The real star of this movie is the black levels. So much horror lurks in the shadows and though so much takes place in dark scenes, these scenes maintain detail in the darkness and the blacks don’t crush. Details abound in the image from the natural scenery of the lake area to the cabins and from the faces and hair to the textiles. The colour palette is great across the spectrum, from the lush greens of foliage to the primaries of clothing. The HDR enhances the specular highlights of camp fires and flashlights.

On the audio side, there’s an English DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1 track as well as a French Dolby Digital 2.0 Mono track. Subtitles are available for English, English SDH, and French. This is apparently the same 5.1 track featured on Shout Factory’s 2020 Blu-ray. The terror is increased if you feel like you’re in the camp and the surrounds do an excellent job of placing ambient and action effects all around you and low frequencies add some weight to the action. The score is dynamic and the dialogue is clear.

Friday the 13th contains both the theatrical and unrated versions of the movie. There’s a digital code and extras include some production featurettes, a reunion, and an audio commentary.

Parmount’s Friday the 13th 4K gives the iconic slasher great audio and video presentations. If you’re a fan of the genre, you’ll want to add this to your collection.

Aug 07, 2022

South Park: The Complete Twenty-Fourth Season Blu-ray review

With Covidiots and QAnoners making the last few years an absolute freak show, the skewering satire of South Park has been sorely needed. Paramount has just released South Park: The Complete Twenty-Fourth Season on Blu-ray and I had a chance to check it out. Cut short by Covid production restrictions, the disc consists of two extended length episodes: The Pandemic Special and South ParQ Vaccination Special. As usual, Trey Parker, Matt Stone and the gang pull no punches as we see the pandemic through the eyes of Cartman, Kyle, Stan, Kenny and Butters.

The 1080p AVC encoded digital transfer is presented in a 1.78:1 aspect ratio. The 2D animation style is served well by the video presentation with great clarity and sharpness for the animations line art. As expected, the colour palette is full of bold primaries.

On the audio side, there’s a single English Dolby TrueHD 5.1 with subtitles available for English SDH. While a pretty front-heavy mix, effects in the surround channels do their job well. The dialogue is clear and centred.

The disc has zero special features, which is a shame as it would have been nice to have a commentary from Parker and Stone about the challenges they faced for this season.

With all of the heaviness and nuttiness of the last few years, shows like South Park can be a well-timed release valve for the absurdity of this world. If you need that, then the South Park: The Complete Twenty-Fourth Season Blu-ray is a good addition to your collection.

Aug 06, 2022

Back to the Beach Blu-ray review

For roughly five years between 1963 and 1968, the beach party film genre was a summer hit with teens and if that genre had a king and queen, it would be Frankie Avalon and Annette Funicello. The pair presided over several beach movies like Beach Blanket Bingo and Muscle Beach Party. The films all followed the same formula: teens on holiday, square adults, surf music and silliness. Jump forward to 1987, and Frankie and Annette reteamed for Back to the Beach, which both parodied and paid homage to the genre. To celebrate its 35th anniversary, Paramount has released the movie as part of its Paramount Presents Blu-ray series. I had a chance to look at the standard packaging version released outside the U.S.

The 1080p AVC encoded digital transfer is presented in a 1.85:1 aspect ratio. The film was restored and mastered from a new 4K scan of the original film elements and the results are great. The image has great detail whether it’s the sand on the beach, the fabric of the various outfits, or the facial features of the performers. The colour palette does the summer beach setting justice with popping primaries, sunny skies and blue waters. Shot on film, the grain structure looks very natural.

On the audio side, the movie comes with an English DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1 soundtrack and a French Dolby Digital 2.0 track. It’s a slightly front-heavy mix with the surrounds getting occasional work here and there for ambient effects. The score is another star and the pop songs sprinkled throughout the film are bright and lively. Dialogue is clear and well prioritized in the mix.

If you’re in the US and get the Paramount Presents packaging, the film comes with a slipcover that opens to reveal the movie’s original poster. Outside the US, the Blu-ray is presented in a standard clamshell case with no slipcover. Both versions come with a digital code. There’s only one extra, a short featurette with director Lyndall Hobbs discussing her director’s journey.

The Back to the Beach Blu-ray gives really nice sound and video to a goofy, fun film the whole family can enjoy. It doesn’t take itself seriously and is good way to head to the beach on a rainy summer’s day.

Aug 05, 2022

Event Horizon 4K SteelBook review

It’s been 25 years since the sci-fi horror movie Event Horizon was released in theatres. Without giving away anything, the story follows the crew of a rescue vessel sent to rescue the deep space exploration ship, Event Horizon, that has reappeared seven years after its disappearance near Neptune. It’s when they reach the vessel that things start to go really bad for the rescuers. To celebrate the 25th anniversary of the film, Paramount has released a 4K SteelBook edition and I had a chance to check it out. The film stars Laurence Fishburne, Sam Neill, Kathleen Quinlan, Joely Richardson and Richard T. Jones.

The 2160p HEVC / H.265 encoded native 4K digital transfer with Dolby Vision and HDR10 is presented in a 2.34:1 aspect ratio. The video presentation is stunning. Impressive detail is present throughout from the various ship interiors to faces, textiles and hair. The colour palette has lots of blues, grays, browns and greens and the HDR colour grading presents them with greater depth. It’s a very dark film and the black levels are deep with no loss of detail in shadows or the darkest scenes. It’s simply a beautiful transfer and the new 4K scan removes any source issues. Digital noise or compression artifacts are also absent.

On the audio side, Paramount has not remixed the soundscape to Dolby Atmos. Instead we get the previous 5.1 mix which is available in an English Dolby TrueHD 5.1 soundtrack as well as German, Spanish, French Italian and Japanese Dolby Digital 5.1 tracks. Subtitles are available for English, English SDH, French, German, Italian, Japanese, and Spanish. It’s a loud mix, but there are some quieter effects in the surrounds which heighten the tension. The low end gets quite a workout and your subwoofer will be sweating after screening this. Though dialogue is generally clear and well-prioritized in the mix, there are a few moments where dialogue seems thin and less prominent.

The SteelBook release has no extras on the 4K disc, but they are on the included 2008 Paramount Blu-ray release. There is also a digital code. Sadly, given the 25th anniversary, we aren’t getting any new bonus features. We do get audio commentary by director Paul W.S. Anderson and producer Jeremy Bolt, a 103 minute “making of” featurette, an in-depth look at the film of some of the scenes, some deleted and extended scenes with director’s commentary, storyboards for an unshot scene, and a theatrical trailer. The SteelBook case depicts an eye reflect a circle of lights and a bloodied hand. When the plastic slipcover is placed over the SteelBook, it shows hands reaching for the centre of the image. The inside of the case depicts a still from the movie.

The 25th anniversary Event Horizon 4K SteelBook has a stunning video transfer, a solid and entertaining audio presentation, a lengthy amount of extras, and fun SteelBook case. Though it would have been nice to see some anniversary content, that’s just a quibble. Highly recommended.

Aug 04, 2022

Sonic the Hedgehog 2 4K review

2020’s Sonic the Hedgehog did very well and its 2022 follow-up, Sonic the Hedgehog 2, adds twice the villainy. Dr. Robotnik (Jim Carrey) opens up a portal to another dimension and out comes Knuckles (Idris Elba), who’s not only the last of his species but a former friend of Sonic (Ben Schwartz). Sonic’s human buddy, Tom (James Marsden), is heading off to a wedding, so Sonic enlists the aid of Tails (Colleen O’Shaughnessey) to stop Robotnik and Knuckles’ nefarious plans. Paramount gave me an early look at the 4K home release.

The 2160p HEVC / H.265 encoded upscaled 4K digital transfer with Dolby Vision and HDR10 is presented in a 2.39:1 aspect ratio. The video presentation is very sharp, whether it’s human faces and textiles, the scenery, or the CGI hairs on Sonic, Knuckles and Tails. The colour palette is the real star, from bright reds and blues to lush greens and earthy browns. The HDR allows the greater colour depth and the deep black levels and darker scenes maintain detail.

On the audio side, your ears have the choice of an English Dolby Atmos track that folds back to Dolby TrueHD 7.1, as well as Latin American and Castilian Spanish and French and French Canadian Dolby Digital 5.1 tracks. Subtitles are available for English, English SDH, French, Spanish, Danish, Finnish, Norwegian and Swedish. The audio is fantastic. The Atmos track makes excellent use of effects in the height channels, and the soundscape has action and ambient effects moving throughout your surrounds. Low frequency effects in your subwoofer give a real deep floor to the action. The score is dynamic and also makes use of the low end, while dialogue is clear, centred and well prioritized in the mix.

The 4K disc comes with a digital code and a slipcover. Extras include audio commentary from director Jeff Fowler and Ben Schwartz, an animated short, about 17 minutes of deleted and extended scenes, bloopers, a Kid Cudi music video, an exploration of the cast dynamic, a character study of Knuckles, a rapid-fire Q&A with Schwartz, a look at Robotnik and Carrey, and a piece on Tails.

The Sonic the Hedgehog 2 4K is a fun film with excellent audio and video and a nice selection of extras. Recommended.

Jul 13, 2022

The Lost City 4K review

With a dollop of action and a ladle of romantic comedy, The Lost City reminded me a bit of Romancing the Stone. Sandra Bullock plays Loretta Sage, an archaeologist turned romance novelist, whose covers always feature the chiseled good looks of male model Alan (Channing Tatum). Loretta finds herself kidnapped by an eccentric billionaire, Abigail Fairfax (Daniel Radcliffe), who believes Loretta can lead him to a priceless jewel. Alan, who thinks he’s just like the heroic character he represents in the books, believes he can rescue Loretta with the help of a former Navy Seal friend (Brad Pitt). Can Loretta be saved? Can her heart be won? Well, now you can find out at home as Paramount has released The Lost City on 4K.

The 2160p HEVC / H.265 encoded transfer with Dolby Vision and HDR10 is presented in a 2.39:1 aspect ratio. It’s a beautiful looking video transfer with impressive detail in flora, fauna, fashion, and faces. The real standout is the colour palette with bright primaries, rich greens and browns in the jungle, dazzling blues in the ocean and sky, and the sparkling purple of Bullock’s sequined outfit. Whites look great and the black levels are deep with excellent detail in the shadows. There are no problems with digital noise or compression artifacts.

On the audio side of things we get an English Dolby Atmos soundtrack that falls back to TrueHD 7.1 for those without Atmos. There are also English Descriptive Audio, Czech, German, Spanish (Castilian and Latin American), French (France and Canada), Italian and Japanese Dolby Digital 5.1 tracks. Subtitles are available for English, English SDH, Cantonese, Czech, Danish, German, Spanish (Castilian and Latin American), French (France and Canada), Italian, Japanese, Korean, Mandarin, Norwegian, Polish, Romanian, Simplified Chinese, Slovak, Finnish, Swedish and Thai, so you can lend the movie to your friends at the United Nations. The Atmos soundscape is well used with weather, explosions and aircraft using the height speakers. The surrounds, well, surround you with ambient sounds, while action effects move throughout with great directionality. The score is bright and dynamic and dialogue is clear, centred and well prioritized in the mix.

The 4K disc also comes with a digital code. The disc has just under an hour of bonus materials, including a slew of small featurettes with cast and crew discussing production elements, scenes and characters. There are also deleted scenes and blooper.

The Lost City 4K is a fun romp with a great cast, excellent audio and video, and a nice selection of extras, Recommended.

Jul 10, 2022

Reno 911! The Hunt for QAnon DVD review

Reno 911!, the Cops-inspired Comedy Central mockumentary about one disastrous police squad, has now spawned its second feature film, Reno 911! The Hunt for QAnon. This time around the squad, led by co-creator Thomas Lennon as Lieutenant Jim Dangle, have been tasked with serving papers on ‘Q’, the leader of the far-right nutjobs known as QAnon. After discovering the conspiracy-loving group is having a convention at sea, the officers buy tickets and set sail. Joining Lennon on this excursion are Robert Ben Garant, Kerri Kenney-Silver, Cedric Yarbrough, Carlos Alazraqui, Wendi McLendon-Covey, Niecy Nash, Mary Birdsong, and Ian Roberts. As always, the show skewers politics and society and crosses the line on an equal opportunity basis, so if you’re easily offended and own a fainting couch, this DVD from Paramount Home Entertainment is not for you.

Shot in HD at a 1.85:1 aspect ratio, the video presentation downsizes cleanly to the DVD resolution. It’s a bright clean image, with good detail and a nice bright colour palette. The black levels are quite good with no evident crushing. You might actually forget you’re not watching a Blu-ray.

On the audio side, the disc comes with an English Dolby Digital 5.1 soundtrack and English SDH subtitles. The effects in the surrounds are playful and dialogue is clear, centred and well prioritized in the mix.

The DVD disc does not come with a digital code but in terms of extras we do get some hilarious deleted scenes.

If you want to watch a great troupe of comic actors skewer the current world for 85 minutes and you’re not easily offended, then Reno 911! The Hunt for QAnon is a fun diversion. Recommended.

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